‘Take nothing but memories ..leave nothing but footprints..’

The beach is one of the few remaining beaches in the world, where the loggerhead turtles still come to lay their eggs between May and October, so measures are in place to ensure that it can be enjoyed by holidaymakers and still remain protected for the turtles.

The endless white sands are breathtakingly beautiful- real ‘Robinson Crusoe country! Without parallel, this spectacular sandy beach is one of the Mediterranean’s finest and was voted by the Sunday Times as one of the top 10 beaches in the world. The beach now forms part of a National Park and a key biodiversity area, rich in birdlife and the breeding ground of the endangered caretta caretta.

There is a small café on the beach serving snacks, light lunches and refreshments. The café has a relaxed, laid back vibe and is designed to be in keeping with the local surroundings. Sun beds and umbrellas are available for hire here and other facilities include showers and toilets.

If you prefer to be away from civilization for a while, you do not need to walk far to ‘get away from it all’ to reach your ‘own little piece of paradise’ as there is an endless stretch of beach to explore! If you are in search of absolute peace, you will find it here.

Strolling on the sand dunes admiring the breathtaking views is magical, particularly at sunset.

Mini buses run back and forth from the village to the beach or for the more energetic, it is a beautiful 20 minute walk.

However for guests staying at the Hotel Patara Viewpoint there is the unique tractor trailer service. Simply grab a seat on our cushioned, shaded trailer and you will be transported to the beach directly from the hotel, passing through 2000 years of history.

Loggerhead turtles weigh up to 200kg and spend all of their life in the water. The females only come  ashore to lay their eggs and come onto the beach at night. They dig a large hole (net) in which they lay their eggs, which they then cover with sand. After 60 days of incubation in the summer sun, the small newly hatched turtles dig themselves free. This usually happens at night, as in order to find their way to the sea, the tiny turtles turn towards the brightest surface – usually the moonlight reflecting on the water. The females remember this place for the rest of their lives. 20 to 30 years later they will return (often from thousands of km away) to the very same beach to lay their eggs. This means that Patara beach needs to continue to be protected as a breeding ground so that the remaining population does not become extinct. For this reason the beach is out of bounds between sunset and sunrise and no lights or buildings are permitted on the beach or surrounding area.